American general turns coat — security jeopardized — Washington issues death sentence

TICONDEROGA, N.Y. — Sunbury Press has released Perilous Journey: The Two Faces of Benedict Arnold, the late Ted Brusaw’s historical novel about the Revolutionary War accomplishments of the controversial general.

pj_fcFew Americans are as controversial as Benedict Arnold, whose name is synonymous with treachery and treason. Arnold was one of the heroes of Fort Ticonderoga, who later became frustrated with the pace of the Revolutionary War and the politics. At a time when all of the patriots were under threat of death for raising arms against the British crown, he caved to the pressure and flipped sides. Ted Brusaw recounts these events with historical accuracy, adding depth and detail only achieved in a novel.

EXCERPT:
Still wearing the uniform of a Massachusetts militia colonel, Benedict Arnold returned the salute of the sentry outside General Washington’s headquarters and entered the building. Pausing to allow his eyes to adjust to the relative darkness, he was surprised to see that General Washington’s headquarters looked remarkably like all the mercantile establishments he had seen during his many years as a merchant. It was crammed with writing desks and tables heaped with documents. Papers were even stacked on the floor, leaving hardly enough space to walk, and officers sat at the desks scratching away with quill pens. In the fireplace, a small blaze kept a kettle of tea hot.

Arnold recognized General Horatio Gates, General Washington’s adjutant general, from descriptions he had heard around army headquarters and campfires. Gates was a squat man of fifty who peered through thick spectacles out of a beefy, red face. Slightly stooped with straggly hair, he looked more like a fussbudget of a schoolmaster than a general. In spite of his appearance, however, he had a reputation in the army for being bluff and hearty with soldiers.

“General Gates, I am Colonel Benedict Arnold, just returned from Fort Ticonderoga,” he introduced himself, aware that Gates would recognize his name. “I have a proposal I would like to submit to General Washington.”

“How are you, Colonel Arnold?” Gates responded, rising and extending his hand.

He casually looked Arnold over, took the proposal, and sat down to scan it. Then he rose. “Wait here, Colonel,” he said. “I will take your proposal to General Washington.”

Gates returned twenty minutes later and escorted Arnold to the inner sanctum of the commander-in-chief of the Continental Army. General Washington stood to greet him. Washington was in his early forties, a man of commanding presence who stood 6′ 2″ and weighed perhaps 190 pounds. His reddish-brown hair was tied in a queue at the back of his head, and wide-set blue eyes looked out from a face that had been scarred by smallpox. Defective teeth showed when he smiled.

“Good day, Colonel,” he said, looking down slightly at the 5′ 8″ Arnold. He motioned to a chair. “Please have a seat and tell me about yourself. Are you married? Do you have children?” Arnold’s proposal to march to Quebec through Maine’s stark wilderness intrigued Washington, and he wanted to size up the man before determining how seriously to take it. Arnold took the offered seat and looked up at the still-standing Washington.

“I was recently widowed, general, and I have three young sons back in Connecticut with my sister.”

Washington seated himself opposite Arnold. “Please accept my sympathy for the loss of your wife. So you are from Connecticut, but you wear the uniform of the Massachusetts militia?” Washington’s brows rose slightly to turn the statement into a question.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Charles “Ted” Brusaw (1931-2015) graduated from Clarksburg High School (Clarksburg, IN) and served in the Air Force for four years. Ted graduated from Miami University (Oxford, OH) and retired from NCR (Dayton, OH) in 1986. He was the co-author on many text books and had three novels published.

Perilous Journey: The Two Faces of Benedict Arnold
Authored by Ted Brusaw
List Price: $19.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
318 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066348
ISBN-10: 1620066343
BISAC: Fiction / Historical / General

Coming Soon on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Perilous-Journey-9781620…

Molly Pitcher look-alike found dead at memorial to Revolutionary War hero

CARLISLE, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released Darkness at First Light, J M West’s third novel in the Carlisle Crime Cases series.

dafl_fcIn Darkness at First Light, Carlisle Homicide Detectives Christopher Snow and Erin ‘Mac’ McCoy discover an unidentified body, dressed like Molly Pitcher’s statue, lashed to the cannon in front of the folk hero’s gravesite. While at the macabre scene, Mac receives a call from Chief March assigning her and K-9 Officer Shadow to an Amber Alert kidnapping. In the process, the CPD IT guru discovers the girl online on a pay-for-porn site, which brings the FBI on board. The trail leads to the Revolutionary War reenactors’ encampment at Valley Forge. As the detectives track ‘Molly Pitcher’s’ elusive killer and Emma’s obsessed kidnapper, the media dog their movements to get the scoop on the sensational trial that follows.

When Mac receives enigmatic, threatening jingles, she risks her life on a solo investigation. As a result, sparks fly as tempers flare at CPD. As the pressure builds, the danger increases! Can Snow and McCoy’s marriage endure the stress of double cases and an infant at home? Can the detectives corral the criminals before they destroy more lives?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Darkness at First Light
is the third in the Carlisle Crime Casesseries of murder mysteries featuring Homicide detectives Christopher Snow and Erin McCoy by Jody McGibney West, pseudonym for Joan M. West, Professor Emerita of English Studies at Harrisburg Area Community College, The Gettysburg Campus. She also taught at Messiah College and Shippensburg University as an adjunct and served as Assistant Director of the Learning Center (SU). She is a member of Sisters in Crime. She has previously published poetry and Glory in the Flower,her debut novel. It depicts four coeds who meet during the turbulent sixties.

She and her husband live near Carlisle, Pennsylvania. They have two sons and two grandsons. In her spare time, West volunteers at the Bookery—Bosler Memorial Library’s used bookstore, participates in the Litwits Book group, and reads voraciously.

molly3EXCERPT:
Death casts a pall of absolute darkness—solid and devoid of sense or sensation, a psyche or any other living trait, a shock nearly beyond human comprehension—and certainly far from the realm of daily conversation—unless it’s somebody else’s. But the abandoned shell tells much, as Dr. Haili Chen, Cumberland County coroner and Fire Marshal Lane Rusk hovered, waiting for a scrim of light to illume the stark scene before them. Rusk’s assistant, Russell Garrett, lumbered among crowded markers carrying a tripod and camera, kicking clumps of dirty snow from his path.

Approaching sirens howled in the distance.

A female corpse dressed in eighteenth-century garb, skirt and legs partially burned, was lashed to the cannon in front of Molly Pitcher’s monument in the Old Carlisle Cemetery enclosed by a limestone wall at the corner of South Bedford and East South Street. In the east, a dove grey ribbon of light exposed a disturbing scene.

The previous night’s downpour had swept the victim’s cap to the ground, freeing limp, mouse-brown curls that hugged the cannon. Eyes—wide pools matching the gray sky—gazed into the void, her face a mask of surprise and terror. Fine crow’s feet, a mole beside her left eyebrow and a wide mouth pulled in a death grimace. A stout, stumpy handle protruded from her chest. Beneath the barrel, her legs and hands were lashed together.

Rusk circled the corpse, examining the scene with a perplexed frown, heavy eyebrows drawn; his mustache quivered as he nosed the charred shreds of burned cloth, bodily fluids and decaying flesh. He scraped a sample from the leg and cut a scrap of the skirt to test. The woman had a decent build, as the wet, coarse homespun clung to her body; she wore no underwear.

“Where’s Detective Snow?” he inquired of Dr. Chen to break the dreadful silence where winter ruled, despite the calendar marking March. A silent cloak of white fog hovered where sounds echoed eerily. Chills shimmied through Rusk’s open coat; he shivered and zipped it.

“On his way.” She consulted her watch, set her leather bag on a nearby stone marker, with an apology to the deceased. She unsnapped it and extracted her thermometer from the inside flap where each sterile instrument was tucked into its own pocket.

“TOD?” He tried again, assuming she’d estimate.

“Hard to say without a liver temp.”

Darkness at First Light: A Christopher Snow & Erin McCoy Mystery
Authored by J M West
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
292 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066485
ISBN-10: 1620066483
BISAC: Fiction / Mystery & Detective / Women Sleuths

Coming Soon on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Darkness-at-First-Light-…

“The puck drops here” in Atchison’s new novel “Blue Lines Up In Arms”

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released Blue Lines Up In Arms, James Craig Atchison’s first novel, a detective thriller woven into a professional hockey setting.

Monica was at wits end. “Damn you, Ray Beck, you’re an auxiliary policeman. You can only do crowd control! Put the gun down!”

bluia_fcSent down nine-year National Hockey League veteran and well-known fox hunter Wavy Ray Beck, and Monica Reedy, the only female detective on the city force, are an unusual and engaging pair of crime fighters. And all is fair in both love and war as they work together to stop an international crime wave bleeding into everyday Pennsylvania.

While Ray searches for a path back to the Stanley Cup Play Offs, Detective Reedy’s search for a downtown window smasher leads the two of them to discover an enterprising high-tech car-theft ring as well as an underground gambling ring, both being orchestrated by an old world crime family rooted in Brooklyn.

The underhanded takeover of a local coal company, plus a disarming real estate gambit, also adds to this story of history, mystery, danger, and chaos.

And, oh my, this naughty pair in love – “Now that I’ve found that spot, Reeds, I’m going to look for another letter.”

The puck drops here. Enjoy!

EXCERPT:
The moon was a celestial banana. Visibility above a hundred feet was zero until interrupted by a star. A yellow haze surrounded each streetlight straining to cast vision for anything alive at three-thirty AM. It was early April with moisture in the air. Silence was in charge.

This wasn’t a very big one so the sound wouldn’t travel far. But it would be heard a long way. Now it stood with winter salt still visible in streaks. FOR LEASE resting in its middle was tattered.

The rusted sign above said The Watering Hole. It would be tonight’s sacrifice and tomorrow’s news.

There were brethren yet to come. And more parts to the puzzle.

In a visceral way this was actually fun. And necessary.

If the dream is to come true, dreams of others must not.

The brick was jagged on one side. A dribble of mortar gripped a corner. But it would sail as directed and arrive as planned on the hyphen between Nichols and Deering.

Glass rained as a heavy whoosh of stale air escaped its former coffin of a scarred floor and bare walls.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
James Craig Atchison is a recovering advertising man who found the giver within while teaching English and Social Studies in public school and earning both MEd and MA Creative Writing degrees from WilkesUniversity, the latter founded in both fiction and playwriting. Combining his love for crime fiction as well as the sport of ice hockey, Blue Lines Up In Arms represents the maiden effort in his plannedBlue Lines series. He resides in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. For more information, see ​his website at http://www.jamescraigatchison.com

Blue Lines Up In Arms
Authored by James Craig Atchison
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
244 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066430
ISBN-10: 1620066432
BISAC: Fiction / Sports

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Blue-Lines-Up-In-Arms-97…

Top secret mission to Tokyo in 1945 by US Airman related to the A-Bomb?

MECHANICSBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Rising Sun Descending, Wade Fowler’s historical/contemporary mystery novel.

rsd_fcAbout the Book:
As journeyman journalist Revere Polk investigates the 40-year-old murder of his grand greatuncle, Jacob Wissler Addison, a cold case suddenly comes to a full boil. What did Uncle Jake’s top secret, but ill-fated, mission to Tokyo in August of 1945 have to do with a modern-day plot to assassinate the president of the United States? And was the atom bombing of Japan really necessary?

The answers await in Rising Sun Descending.

Excerpt:
8 a.m. Monday, August 15, 2011, Harrisburg, PA
“You’re being downsized,” Grayson Collingsworth said.

Revere Polk had just settled into the stuffed leather visitor’s chair in Collingsworth’s plush office on the second floor of the Daily Telegraph, three blocks off Market Square.

Rumors of layoffs were rampant in the newsroom. Revere—Rev to friend and foe alike―had rehearsed a dozen reactions and decided silence was the best strategy. He crossed one long leg over the other, cocked his head to the right, and considered Collingsworth as if he were sighting down the barrel of an assault rifle.

Down on the street, state workers scurried from the parking garages to their jobs in the halls of government. Harrisburg, the capital of Pennsylvania, cleaved to state government like a tick to a bloodhound.

The wood paneling of Collingsworth’s office gleamed in the sunlight peeking through the curtains. Footprints would linger on the plush pile until the next vacuuming. The editor’s big desk glowed with the patina of years of furniture polish.

Collingsworth lurked behind the desk, six-two, and 250 pounds—a collegiate linebacker going to seed in middle age. The trappings of power diminished him more than they built him up. Pockmarked and greasy-haired, he was a mutt misplaced at Westminster.

Younger by a decade and taller by a good two inches, Rev was a fit 210 pounds. He slouched in contemptuous nonchalance.

“Well, say something,” Collingsworth barked.

Point for the home team, Rev thought. “So the profit margin’s down to what, nine percent? Most businesses these days would kill for those numbers. Grocery stores get by on 2 percent … or less.”

Collingsworth’s wince told Rev that his analysis was spot on.

“And your solution is to fire the experienced staff, and leave the news gathering to young pups who can’t find their asses with both hands.”

“It’s the economy, Rev. You know that as well as I do.”

The editor’s gruff voice couldn’t obscure the cheap whine he’d brought to this party.

“Christ, Gray, Jillian what’s-her-name, your new city hall reporter, misspelled the mayor’s name in the lead of today’s A-1 story on the incinerator bond debacle and the dumb newbies on the copy desk didn’t catch it until the suburban edition―and then only because I told them. Is that what this business is coming to?”

“Don’t you want to hear the terms?” Collingsworth asked.

Rev’s smile didn’t reach his eyes. “Sure, Gray. Why don’t you tell me how magnanimous you’re going to be?”

“We’re prepared to offer you a year’s salary and medical benefits … as long as you sign a one-year non-compete.”

“I suppose you’re offering Sophie the same deal?”

Collingsworth leaned back in his chair and made a tent of his fingertips. “Actually, we’ve asked Sophie to stay on. We can’t empty the stable of all our investigative reporters.”

About the Author
Wade Fowler is a career journalist with more than thirty years of experience with daily and weekly newspapers. He was a copy editor, feature writer and beat reporter for The Patriot-News of Harrisburg, PA, for 10 years before leaving to become editor of the Perry County Times in New Bloomfield.

He has won Keystone Press Awards for investigative reporting, feature series writing, and headline writing and is a former president of the Pennsylvania Society of Newspaper Editors.

Fowler is a native of North Carolina, a veteran of the U.S. Navy, and a graduate of Guilford College, Greensboro, N.C.

He and his wife, Sharon, live in New Cumberland, PA. They have three children and two grandchildren.

Rising Sun Descending
Authored by Wade Fowler
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
296 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065358
ISBN-10: 1620065355
BISAC: Fiction / Historical

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Rising-Sun-Descending-97…

Civil War reenactors travel time to right a wrong they caused during their last visit to 1863

GETTYSBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released The Death Machine, Charles K. Godfrey’s sequel to the bestsellingThe Final Charge.

About the Book:
tdm_fc
The Death Machine
is the sequel to The Final Charge, the story of Mike, Ray, and Gordon, three Civil War reenactors, who accidentally time traveled to Gettysburg in July, 1863. They took part in Pickett’s Charge and, at the end, when they made it home, they discovered they had somehow changed history.

The characters find themselves in a wonderful new world, but underneath its facade, there exists an evil that continues to grow. One of the characters is murdered, and the others risk their lives, traveling through time again to try to reset the timeline. This involves stopping a secret weapon that could foil their plans.

Excerpt:
Friday, July 3, 1863
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

It was a sultry 90-degree day. The sky rained hot metal down on the men crossing the Emmitsburg Road. Double canister tore through the Confederate rank and file every step of the way. Pickett’s Charge was in its final minutes as the Confederates dashed toward the stone wall at the area known as the Angle. In the oppressive heat of the day and the dense smoke of cannon fire, Armistead’s Confederate brigade passed through the two decimated brigades of Garnett and Kemper that were at the front.

With the stench of sulfur in their mouths and nostrils, the men of the Ninth Virginia Regiment headed for the stone wall, right where Lieutenant Cushing’s Fourth U.S. Light Artillery was located. Lieutenant Cushing had his men push the two cannons down to the stone wall to greet the oncoming Confederates. Sergeant Fuger was at his side and in the process of loading the guns when Lt. Cushing was hit in the groin by a piece of shrapnel. Lt. Cushing fell against the gun and slid to the ground, holding his wound.

Sergeant Fuger rushed to his side. “Lon, you okay?” He saw Lt. Cushing’s guts protruding from his wound and he called for the medical stewards. When the stewards got there, Cushing waved them off.

“Please, Fred, help me up,” Cushing asked.

Sergeant Fuger helped him to his feet and with the Confederates coming over the wall, Lt. Cushing grabbed his sergeant by the lapel. “Give them double canister.”

“Let ‘em have it!” Sergeant Fuger yelled.

Unbeknownst to Cushing, the gunners were killed before they could get the shots off. Seeing the bayonets coming his way, Lt. Cushing yelled, “Fire the damn–“

At that very moment, a Minié ball entered his mouth and blew out the back of his head. He fell from the sergeant’s arms to the ground, dead.

After witnessing the death of Lt. Cushing, Sergeant Fuger turned his attention to the Confederates coming over the wall. He pulled the lanyard. The discharge was devastating. Hell seemed to be cut loose on the remaining Confederates inside the Angle.

The smoke was so thick and the noise so loud that confusion gripped the battlefield. The two sides struggled and fought in deadly hand-to-hand combat. Men picked up rocks and threw them at each other. Cushing’s battery was overrun and the Confederate flags were going up over the stone wall.

Union General Webb, seeing the hole punched into the lines, put in reinforcements at the Angle and the tide soon turned. The Confederates were driven back. One by one, the men in butternut and gray were on the retreat.

The battle was over, but the carnage remained. Smoke boiled up from the battlefield along with the sickening stench of death that filled the air.

Wounded men from both sides begged for water, while the horses writhed in their death rattles. It was the true picture of butchery and death. Pickett’s Charge was over.

About the Author:
CKGodfreyCharles K. Godfrey started out in Baltimore County Fire Department as a Firefighter and was quickly promoted to Paramedic. He was promoted to Lieutenant and served the Fire Investigation unit. He retired as a Fire Lieutenant with 27 years’ service.

During this time, as a hobby, he reenacted the Civil War with the First Maryland Volunteer Infantry Regiment. For more than twenty years, he participated in the reenactments of Gettysburg, Manassas, Cedar Creek, and many others, including living history events at Fort McHenry and Harpers Ferry. He took part in the 150th ceremonies at Gettysburg.

He is a history buff that likes to blend fiction with history. In addition, he is enthusiastic about science fiction and loves the idea of time travel. He resides in northern Baltimore County with his wife of 40 years.

The Death Machine
Authored by Charles K Godfrey
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
238 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065754
ISBN-10: 1620065754
BISAC: Fiction / Historical

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Death-Machine-978162…

Eastwood’s “American Sniper” reminds us all of the true cost of war

by Lawrence Knorr

CAMP HILL, PA — As the film ended, after nearly 2 1/2 hours, the credits ran and no one stood.  No one spoke.  No one reached for their phone.  As the last credit rolled, all quietly stood — a room of over 300 movie patrons who were total strangers to one another.  Quietly and politely, as if at a solemn funeral, each exited their rowMV5BMTkxNzI3ODI4Nl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMjkwMjY4MjE@._V1_SX214_AL_ and walked to the door.  Some spoke only in hushed tones as we emptied out.  To say “American Sniper” had an impact on the audience would be an understatement.  It was the most powerful reaction to a film I have ever witnessed.

Why this reaction?  Since there were no exchanges with the patrons, I can only imagine they were thinking similarly to me.  Eastwood’s movie had struck an inner chord of human nature — a deep sense of loss coupled with the sincere respect for Chris Kyle, the Navy Seal played by Bradley Cooper.  But, that’s not the only thing.  In fact, the overriding realization is the cost of war — whether it is the mental anguish a soldier faces, or the horrors the populace in a war zone encounters, or the early deaths of so many on both sides, or the toll on the families back home — during and after the conflict.

This was not a film that glorified war — or the SEALs — or our country’s invasion of  Iraq.  It was not NRA propaganda or a recruiting tool for sniper training.  Those that are trying to make more out of it than an honest appraisal of the human price paid in such conflicts are completely off base.

If nothing else, regardless of our beliefs and all of the disagreements we have among us as Americans, we must rally behind our veterans — especially those that served in battle zones, and especially those that carry the scars, whether physical or mental.  These men and women served our country.  Whether or not you are proud of the results or agreed with the circumstances, I urge you to please support them.

If you haven’t seen the film and are unsure about how you feel about our veterans, the $9.50 per ticket to see “American Sniper” is worth every penny.

Nude body found in Letort Spring near Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA

CARLISLE, Pa.Sunbury Press has released J. M. West’s second installment of the Carlisle Crime CasesCourting Doubt and Darkness – A Christopher Snow and Erin McCoy Mystery.

About the Book:
cdad_fcIn the second Carlisle Crimes Case, Courting Doubt and Darkness, Homicide Detectives Christopher Snow and Erin McCoy tail a killer who stymies the police with multiple MO’s. While McCoy testifies at the trial of sisters who kidnapped her in Dying for Vengeance, Snow and Savage recover a  nude body from the Letort Spring. While tracking sparse clues, another killing surfaces  that rings alarms: the victims were connected. The chase leads to an active Marcellus oil rig. As police tangle with hostile suspects, they are courting doubt and darkness, leaving the comfort of Carlisle to the wilds of the Raccoon Mountain. When eight-month pregnant McCoy joins the case, she discovers her Native American relatives are involved. Then she stumbles into the killer’s path!  Join them on their journey!

Excerpt:
Carlisle Police Department’s Senior Detective Christopher Snow hammered the Wrangler’s brakes to avoid blowing through the red light on R 15 south of Lewisburg. “Shit!” Glancing in his rear view and side mirrors for any flashing lights and cocking his head to catch a siren’s whine, he huffed a sigh when none materialized. Oh, he could flash his shield, but that wasn’t setting much of an example.

The recorder on the seat beside him shifted. Snow picked it up, leaned over to open the glove box and tossed it in. His thumbs drummed the steering wheel, waiting impatiently for green while traffic piled up behind him. Unease gripped his gut, and experience had taught him to pay attention. “What spooked that woman during our interview?” he mumbled. “What had she gained from her husband’s death? Her inheritance seemed typical.” The query about her job caused her to break eye contact and cross her arms defensively across her chest. “Why? Because she knows more than she’s telling.” He talked to himself a lot since he’d ordered his wife and partner, Detective Erin McCoy, who usually accompanied him, to man the war room and feed him information when he needed it. “Damn it, woman, why can’t you follow orders?” He had also assigned his former partner Reese Savage to assist Mac, since the Chief relegated him to desk duty.

Neither answered the phone in Conference One when he called for a background check on Greer. CPD had consolidated the case files, data, listed info on white boards on their homicide and two other related ones—at the RV parked along the Susquehanna near Winfield and the Safety Coordinator’s body at the West Enterprises’ Williamsport well.

Worry forced him to accelerate. He dialed HQ again and left a terse message for both. “I need to know what I’m up against!” Part of the Marcellus Shale zone beneath Penn’s Woods, West Enterprises’active well was ‘fracking,’ or shattering the shale with millions of gallons of water, sand and over 500 chemicals miles underneath the surface to free the natural gas and oil, which then flowed to the surface through the horizontal pipes and up the vertical well, to be delivered to consumers.

He dialed Mac’s cell. It went to voicemail. “This is important; neither you nor Savage are at HQ working this case? Where the hell are you?” He snapped the clamshell shut. “You’re both insubordinate, so you’d better have a damn good explanation for your absence!” When his cell chirped, he checked the caller: HQ. “About damn time.”

Snow hit talk. “Hello? Where the hell have you two been?”

Savage explained that they’d gone to BWI to arrest Abigail Benedict for the murder of Mindy Murphy. Then he put Mac on speakerphone to summarize Sienna Greer’s arrest record, which included a DV incident, several DUIs and a road rage incident.

“Chris, where are you exactly?” Erin asked.

He dialed back his anger and gazed at the water. “About twelve miles south of Lewisburg.” The river, a beautiful silvery ribbon slipping downstream, the sun playing upon the waves. Silver and gold reflections darted back and forth, refracted into a thousand dancing crosses of light. What he wouldn’t give to spend a few hours…

While the Susquehanna distracted him, a blue semi barreled out of nowhere, bearing down on him, gaining ground quickly. Though there was room to pass, the trucker just mowed down the highway toward his Jeep. He checked the rear-view mirror as the cab loomed into view. Too late, he floored his accelerator as he veered into the outside lane, the truck following.

Suddenly, squealing breaks and metal smacking metal followed, crunching and what sounded like dragging. His last conscious thought was Mac yelling into the phone. “Describe your location!”

About the Author:
JMWCourting Doubt and Darkness
is the second in the Carlisle Crime Cases series of murder/mysteries featuring Homicide detectives Christopher Snow and Erin McCoy by Jody McGibney West, pseudonym for Joan M. West, Professor Emerita of English Studies at Harrisburg Area Community College, The Gettysburg Campus. She also taught at Messiah College and Shippensburg University as an adjunct and served as Assistant Director of the Learning Center (SU). She has previously published poetry andGlory in the Flower, her debut novel. It depicts four coeds who meet during the turbulent sixties.

She and her husband live near Carlisle, Pennsylvania. They have two sons and two grandsons. In her spare time, West volunteers at the Bookery—Bosler Memorial Library’s used bookstore, participates in the Litwits Book group, and reads voraciously.

Courting Doubt and Darkness: A Christopher Snow & Erin McCoy Mystery
Authored by J. M. West
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
372 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065488
ISBN-10: 1620065487
BISAC: Fiction / Mystery & Detective / Police Procedural

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Courting-Doubt-and-Darkn…

BOOKSIGNING EVENT:

Joan West will be appearing at the Sunbury Press Store ar 50 West Main Street in Mechanicsburg, PA along with author Catherine Jordan (the Bookseller’s Secret) on Friday, February 6th from 6 pm to 9PM.  The authors will read from their books at 8 PM.