Paul Sorvino: “‘The Making of a Don’ is atavistic, primitive, and oh so hard to put down.”

NEW YORK — Sunbury Press has released The Making of a Don, Charles Ursitti’s fictionalized account of the rise of a Mafia boss in New York’s Little Italy decades ago.

Paul Sorvino

Paul Sorvino

What Others Are Saying:
This book is most rare in its chronicling of a mafia family. Ursitti tells the story without sentimentality or literary agenda. As easily as ordering a plate of pasta with sausages. His style seeks no approval for itself but in short order the minimalism, nay innocence, compels and invades so that you feel you are in the very rooms where the hits are agreed to and business is set aright and lurking death is assuaged once more. Atavistic, primitive and oh so hard to put down! — PAUL SORVINO (actor: Good Fellas, Nixon, Law & Order, Murder She Wrote, Moonlighting …)

About the Book:
Frankie Boy reminisces about his childhood living in a big, Italian, Mafia family in New York City and how excited everyone would get each time Uncle Frank, also his mentor and idol, came by his grandma’s house for a delicious, Italian meal. Uncle Frank is Frankie Boy’s entire world growing up, and he continues to be so throughout his life. However, Frankie Boy wants to pave his own path in life, a life of legitimacy, and a life where his hard-earned degree is being put to good use. With the help and support of Uncle Frank, he is able to do so. However, life doesn’t always unravel exactly as we’d like it to, especially when your uncle is Capo dei Capi, Boss of Bosses, and Frankie Boy finds himself once again searching for his place and purpose in life. Uncle Frank once again offers him the opportunity to learn tmoad_fcthe family business, and after much deliberating, Frankie Boy begins learning the ins and outs of mob life with his best friend Nicky at his side, a loyal and loving friend that goes to extreme lengths to ensure the success of Frankie.

The Making of a Don is a raw and very real portrayal of the inner workings and hierarchy of the Italian Mafia. Frankie Boy works his way up from the very bottom with the experienced guidance of his uncle, and he learns that even those that are closest, those that are “family,” can still betray you in the worst ways possible. Frankie must decide who he can really trust, who has his back, and what lengths to take to protect his business, his family, and his friendships. Nothing is at it seems when you’re in the mob, and Frankie must find ways to ensure all five families are happy and under his thumb.

About the Author:
Charles J. Ursitti grew up in New York City and has spent most of his life there.

After working in the corporate world for ten years, Charles turned his talents into producing and promoting billiards. His events were aired on ABC’s Wide World of Sports with Howard Cosell for five years, CBS Sports Spectacular with John Madden for seven years, NBC’s Sport World, ESPN, USA Cable and numerous other local cable stations. He managed and promoted the legends of the game including Willie Mosconi, Minnesota Fats, and Steve Mizerak, just to name a few. He also created

Charles Ursitti (right) shaking Willie Mosconi's hand while Howard Cosell looks on.

Charles Ursitti (right) shaking Willie Mosconi’s hand while Howard Cosell looks on.

the most accurate and complete history of both pocket billiards and three cushion billiards from their inception in 1878 to present times. He is known as one of the most knowledgeable billiard historians in the world. His efforts were rewarded when on October 29, 2015 Charlie became the 66th inductee in the prestigious Billiard Congress of America’s Hall of Fame.

Charlie was also a firearms designer and a professional skeet, trap and handgun shooter. After a severe car accident in April of 2000, he retired from shooting and turned his skills to writing. He wrote for several billiard magazines and then turned to writing novels.

The Making Of A Don is his first published novel.

The Making of a Don
Authored by Charles J. Ursitti
List Price: $9.99
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
144 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066775
ISBN-10: 1620066777
BISAC: Fiction / Thrillers / Crime

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Making-of-a-Don-9781…

American general turns coat — security jeopardized — Washington issues death sentence

TICONDEROGA, N.Y. — Sunbury Press has released Perilous Journey: The Two Faces of Benedict Arnold, the late Ted Brusaw’s historical novel about the Revolutionary War accomplishments of the controversial general.

pj_fcFew Americans are as controversial as Benedict Arnold, whose name is synonymous with treachery and treason. Arnold was one of the heroes of Fort Ticonderoga, who later became frustrated with the pace of the Revolutionary War and the politics. At a time when all of the patriots were under threat of death for raising arms against the British crown, he caved to the pressure and flipped sides. Ted Brusaw recounts these events with historical accuracy, adding depth and detail only achieved in a novel.

EXCERPT:
Still wearing the uniform of a Massachusetts militia colonel, Benedict Arnold returned the salute of the sentry outside General Washington’s headquarters and entered the building. Pausing to allow his eyes to adjust to the relative darkness, he was surprised to see that General Washington’s headquarters looked remarkably like all the mercantile establishments he had seen during his many years as a merchant. It was crammed with writing desks and tables heaped with documents. Papers were even stacked on the floor, leaving hardly enough space to walk, and officers sat at the desks scratching away with quill pens. In the fireplace, a small blaze kept a kettle of tea hot.

Arnold recognized General Horatio Gates, General Washington’s adjutant general, from descriptions he had heard around army headquarters and campfires. Gates was a squat man of fifty who peered through thick spectacles out of a beefy, red face. Slightly stooped with straggly hair, he looked more like a fussbudget of a schoolmaster than a general. In spite of his appearance, however, he had a reputation in the army for being bluff and hearty with soldiers.

“General Gates, I am Colonel Benedict Arnold, just returned from Fort Ticonderoga,” he introduced himself, aware that Gates would recognize his name. “I have a proposal I would like to submit to General Washington.”

“How are you, Colonel Arnold?” Gates responded, rising and extending his hand.

He casually looked Arnold over, took the proposal, and sat down to scan it. Then he rose. “Wait here, Colonel,” he said. “I will take your proposal to General Washington.”

Gates returned twenty minutes later and escorted Arnold to the inner sanctum of the commander-in-chief of the Continental Army. General Washington stood to greet him. Washington was in his early forties, a man of commanding presence who stood 6′ 2″ and weighed perhaps 190 pounds. His reddish-brown hair was tied in a queue at the back of his head, and wide-set blue eyes looked out from a face that had been scarred by smallpox. Defective teeth showed when he smiled.

“Good day, Colonel,” he said, looking down slightly at the 5′ 8″ Arnold. He motioned to a chair. “Please have a seat and tell me about yourself. Are you married? Do you have children?” Arnold’s proposal to march to Quebec through Maine’s stark wilderness intrigued Washington, and he wanted to size up the man before determining how seriously to take it. Arnold took the offered seat and looked up at the still-standing Washington.

“I was recently widowed, general, and I have three young sons back in Connecticut with my sister.”

Washington seated himself opposite Arnold. “Please accept my sympathy for the loss of your wife. So you are from Connecticut, but you wear the uniform of the Massachusetts militia?” Washington’s brows rose slightly to turn the statement into a question.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Charles “Ted” Brusaw (1931-2015) graduated from Clarksburg High School (Clarksburg, IN) and served in the Air Force for four years. Ted graduated from Miami University (Oxford, OH) and retired from NCR (Dayton, OH) in 1986. He was the co-author on many text books and had three novels published.

Perilous Journey: The Two Faces of Benedict Arnold
Authored by Ted Brusaw
List Price: $19.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
318 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066348
ISBN-10: 1620066343
BISAC: Fiction / Historical / General

Coming Soon on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Perilous-Journey-9781620…

Book Expo America a blast for Sunbury Press authors, owners and staff

BEA - 002

“Power Readers” pour into BEA on Saturday June 1, 2013

New York, NY — Book Expo America, the largest publishing trade show in North America, was held at the Jacob Javits Center in New York City from Thursday May 30 through Saturday June 1, 2013.   The exposition highlighted the latest technology and developments in the book publishing industry, and was a showcase for star and emerging talent.  All of the big publishers including Simon & Schuster, Hachette, McGraw-Hill, Penguin, Random House, Scholastic and others, joined with leaders in publishing services such as Ingram, Baker & Taylor, Createspace, Sony, Kobo and many others.  Notables such as Chris Matthews, Stephen King, Jim Carey, Ann Romney and Rick Atkinson were just a small number of the multitudes of well-known authors and personalities present.

Sunbury Press joined with the Independent Book Publisher’s Association (IBPA) and other independent publishers in aisle 2300. Sunbury had a slate of authors appear at their table. Several were photographed or interviewed by the media. Appearing at this year’s expo were:

Thursday May 30: Carole LaPlante, Robert Miller and Ernest Marshall

Friday May 31: Mary Dimino, Thomas Malafarina, Cathy Jordan and Margaret Meacham

Saturday June 1: Mike Sgrignoli, Shelly Frome and Joanne Risso

 

 

 

BEA - Carole LaPlante

Carole LaPlante

BEA - Ernest Marshall

Ernest Marshall

BEA - Maggie Meacham

Margaret Meacham

BEA - Mary Dimino

Mary Dimino

BEA - Mike Sgrignoli

Mike Sgrignoli

BEA - Robert Miller

Robert Miller

BEA - Shelly Frome

Shelly Frome

BEA Cathy Jordan

Cathy Jordan

BEA- Joanne Risso

Joanne Risso

BEA Tom Malafarina

Thomas Malafarina

 

Doug Brode’s Kennedy assassination novel “Patsy!” goes national – Sunbury’s April bestsellers

Mechanicsburg, PA – “Patsy!”, Doug Brode’s nonfiction novel relating Lee Harvey Oswald’s perspective on the Kennedy assassination,  was #1 upon release thanks to media attention, including the Dennis Miller show. Anthony Julian’s “Pit Bulls,” a collection of vintage photos of these pets and their families ranked #2 due to heavy interest from dog shelters and dog rescue supporters.

"Patsy!" by Douglas Brode

“Patsy!” by Douglas Brode

Sunbury Press experienced its best April ever. In fact, it was the company’s best month since December 2011 and the best non-holiday month in its history!  Sales for April 2013 were up 92% over April 2012, with growth in eBooks outpacing growth in print. “We’re moving at a good clip heading into BEA,” said publisher Lawrence Knorr. “Sales are up 52% year-to-date. We continue to expand our distribution channels and grow our direct-to-consumer and direct-to-store sales.”

The late Linnea Jepson’s “Linnea’s Kitchen: Yummy Ayurvedic Recipes and Life Lessons” has been selling briskly since the author’s unexpected passing. A second print run is being contemplated by her heirs.

“Emeralds of the Alhambra,” John Cressler’s soon-to-be released historical novel about religious harmony in medieval Spain has been bolstered by advance sales.

Susan Emmi’s newly released “As a Guest of Clive Barnes – Journeys through the Ballet with Clive Barnes and Others,” grabbed the 5 spot due to author activities in New York City.

Jess Steven Hughes’ novel “The Sign of the Eagle,” set in ancient Rome, was #6 in sales thanks to author activities.

“The 3-5-7 Model,” Darla Henry and Associates’ program to counsel grieving children, took the 7 spot thanks to author events.

“In the Shadow of a Mountain,” Susan Dahlgren Daigneault’s memoir about her famous father, WW2 hero Ed Dahlgren, “The Sergeant York of Maine,” stayed on the chart at #8 thanks to author appearances.

Mike Campbell’s “Amelia Earhart – The Truth At Last” continues to sell well, taking #9 on the list.

Steve Troutman’s “Tulpehocken Trail Traces,” detailing the remnants of the old Indian path from Shamokin to Conrad Weiser’s homestead returned to the chart thanks to author appearances.

Following are the top overall print sellers by category:

History / Memoir – “As a Guest of Clive Barnes” by Susan Emmi
Fiction  – “Patsy!” by Doug Brode
Horror/Mystery – “Of Guilt and Innocence” by John Scanlan
Children/YA – “The Ghosts of Laurelford” by Margaret Meacham
The Arts – “As a Guest of Clive Barnes” by Susan Emmi
Self-Help – “Linnea’s Kitchen: Yummy Ayurvedic Recipes and Life Lessons” by Linnea Jepson
Metaphysical/Spiritual – “Messages from Beyond” by Michele Livingston
Reference – “Linnea’s Kitchen: Yummy Ayurvedic Recipes and Life Lessons” by Linnea Jepson

Pit Bulls

Pit Bulls

The company released five new titles during the month of April:
“Pit Bulls” by Anthony Julian
“As a Guest of Clive Barnes” by Susan Emmi
“A Matter of Love in da Bronx” by Paul Argentini
“Patsy!” by Doug Brode
“Translations of Favorite German and English Poems” by Fritz VonderHeiden

For a list of Sunbury’s all-time best-sellers, please see the Sunbury Press web site:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/BESTSELLERS_c3.htm

For a complete list of recent and upcoming releases, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/COMING-SOON_c47.htm